#MUFFApproved: Hairspray

#MUFFApproved: Hairspray

  (Still courtesy of New Line)

(Still courtesy of New Line)

Hairspray (2007)

dir. Adam Shankman
Starring: Nikki Blonsky, Michelle Pfeiffer, Amanda Bynes, Queen Latifah, Brittany Snow   

Hairspray is such a quintessential musical. It hosts an amazing cast, including Nikky Blonsky, Michelle Pfeiffer and Queen Latifah, and tells a great story of women going against society’s expectations and ideals.

The stunning star, Nikki Blonsky, as Tracy Turnblad is body-positive, equality-fighting and a fantastic dancer. She’s such a cute and energetic character that you really really want her to succeed. Even though it’s set in the 60s, she’s a progressive free-thinker and positively influences others around her (e.g. helping her mother see the world). She recognizes the injustices African Americans are facing and, forwardly, proposes that the clear divide between black and white be abolished. She’s not only a girly girl with amazing hair, she’s a pioneering, socially aware crusader.

The film depicts women in many other ways, too. Because, after all, it’s important to show all kinds of women. I want to see women of all types on screen–not just the heroic ones. I love a fierce, powerful female villain. And Michelle Pfeiffer as Velma Von Tussle is just that. She’s a strong, dominating powerhouse who has a sustainable amount of control in the TV business. Although she threatens Tracy’s success, she exercises her dominance with engaging magnetism. She’s a character that you love to hate and her presence on screen is both tense and charming, making for a perfect antagonist. Not to mention: she in an influential businesswoman in the 60s, so go her!

On the other side of the camera, you have the lovely Leslie Dixon who wrote the screenplay (based on the musical and the 1988 screenplay), and Linda Favila and Jennifer Gibot as producers. Though the bulk of the crew it is dominated by men, women proudly represent in many important roles.

The film is all about women in the 1960’s. It’s about women fighting for their freedom, and recognizing the fact that beauty is subjective. The young girls learn to embrace the changing times, advocate for equality and learn amazing new ways to style their hair. Overall, this film is so much fun and so positive that it's impossible not to enjoy. 

See for yourself:


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